art · math · STEAM · teachers pay teacher

Monster Math!

This week is all about MONSTERS! This is such a fun topic for children as they can be both fun and scary. But we will focus on the fun side! Today’s story Monster Math by Anne Miranda… read by Anne Miranda! This is a story about a Monster’s birthday and how many monsters join the fun!

Shape Monster created by Adam Ray Daniels’ Cartoons for my TPT store kits

So … it’s time for a favorite activity and character: Shape Monster! Shape Monster Shape Monster munch, munch, munch? How about about a (color) (shape) for your lunch! This is a common kindergarten shape activity, but can so easily be adapted!

I’ll share with you a few ideas on how you can use the shape monster today.

Create simple shape monsters (or complex if you want). Put them onto bags or onto empty boxes to make the shape monster’s lunch bag/box. Label each monster with a shape. (circle monster, square monster, rectangle monster etc…). Have your child find items around they can put into the shape monster’s lunch bag.

Provide your child with construction paper, either already cut into shapes or have your child cut his/her own shapes. Use the shapes to create a monster out of shapes… a shape monster! Or if you do not have construction paper, they can just draw a monster out of shapes!

Want more shape monster fun? I have two kits in my store that use Shape Monster!

Show preview image 3

Shape Monster’s 2D lunch time mini book ($2)… Help shape monster find the shapes he wants to for lunch. Each page focuses on one shape and provides a color for each shape. And, Shape Monster himself describes the shapes attributes.

Shape Graphing with Shape Monster ($1)… This kit has your child(ren) sorting and graphing shapes. The kit includes four different graphing pages (spin and graph, color and graph, grab and graph and find and graph)

game · math · topic

Pumpkin Bump Game

This week we will be looking at pumpkins! Who doesn’t like to learn about pumpkins? Here is a fun pumpkin story to listen to: Too Many Pumpkins by Linda White. What would you do if you had too many pumpkins? Well listen to what Rebecca Estelle does with all the pumpkins she finds!

Today you are getting two stories… How Many Seeds in Pumpkin by Margaret McNamara. The children in Mr. Tiffin’s class learn about estimating, sizes, counting and more by counting the seeds in three different sized pumpkins.

Time for some pumpkin math! I encourage you to do some math/investigations with real pumpkins at home.

  • How much does your pumpkin weight? How much does it weigh after you take out the seeds and the pulp? After you carved it?
  • How many lines are on your pumpkin?
  • How tall is it?
  • What is the circumference of your pumpkin?
  • How many seeds are inside?
  • Will it sink or float? Does it sink or float after you took out the seeds and pulp?

Now lets play a game!

Bump is a fun dice game to play with kids. I will teach you how to play and then share how to easily alter the game to work on different skills.

I will show you the simplest version first. Create a gameboard, I drew pumpkins (sad looking pumpkins I admit!) for mine. On the gameboard write the numbers 1-6 since we will only use one die for this version. Each player needs 10 counters, transparent counters work best, but aren’t necessary.

Directions:

  • roll the die
  • put your marker on that number
  • next player rolls and they put their piece on that number
  • if you roll a number that the other player is covering, you can bump them off that space
  • if you roll a number that you are already covering you can double cover and lock the space.
  • First person to use all 10 counters wins!

Easy and Fun!

Variations on the game:

use two dice and add them together

use one die and have the children add one (I would write _____ +1= on the board and have the children put the die in the blank space to remember to add one

double roll one die but cover it’s double (roll 2 but cover 4, roll 3 but cover 6)

use three dice

older kids you can use the dice to multiply or practice place value… so many options!!

math · story · teachers pay teacher · topic

Count the Room

This week we will discuss scarecrows! To start off the week, here is a favorite story: There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed Some Leaves by Lucille Colandro. Make sure you check out the live stream I did on Facebook on Friday. Click on the button below hear hear me read the story The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything!

Ok… onto math! This week lets work on a number sense, counting and number recognition activity…. count the room. Count the room can be done a few different ways…

The first way is to have cards around the room that show quantities of object, 1 scarecrow, 2 pumpkins, 3 hay bales etc. Then your child will find the cards around the room, count the quantity of items and record the number to practice numeral writing.

The second way is to have number cards around the room, then have your child fill in a ten frame(s) to show how many that number represents.

Suggested items to draw/print out to make the cards: scarecrow, pumpkin, leaf, apple, hay bale, candy corn, crow, squirrel, pinecone, sunflower, or any other fall items. Or you could do things with a scarecrow: shirt, pants, patches, hat, pole, straw, leaves, shoes, crows etc… you pick!

While it might seem that these are the same they are actually working on different skills. The first works on conservation of number, counting, and writing numerals. The second works on number recognition and number sense (how many a number means). These are both important and often over looked math skills! So… have fun with your kiddo doing this activity. I would suggest give him/her a clipboard or whiteboard to take around, it adds to the enjoyment level.

Count the Room-- Fall items

If you are looking for a quick way to set this up and have recording sheets, consider purchasing my Count the Room Fall Items kit at Teachers Pay Teachers. This kit costs $1.50 and contains number cards for both sets of activities as well as 3 different recording sheets!

math · STEAM

Fall Measurement

Time to get outside and do a bit of measuring! I went around my yard and collected a variety of items.

I will show you a few different PreK/kindergarten skills on measurement with these items.

First I took all the leaves and compared the length of the leaves and then put them in order from largest to smallest. Encourage the use of terms such as longest, shortest, longer, shorter, compared to, equal to.

Then I used acorns to measure the items. You want to try to find acorns that are about the same size or you can print out paper acorns such as the ones in the kit I will tell you about at the bottom of this post.

This is an opportunity to work on measuring expectations.

Making sure you start at the edge of the item (top, bottom or side depending on how you are measuring).

Try to get to the exact opposite edge in a straight line.

All the items should be touching without any gaps, or as much as possible… the acorns were rolling every time I tried to take a picture.

You could also take a ruler or yard stick outside and practice standard measurements too!

Non-Standard Measurement for Fall

Looking for more measurement? Want to do some measurement inside? The Non-Standard Measurement for Fall kit can be used for measure the room (put the pictures around the room even better around your house) and have your child find the pictures and then measure them. You can use the long recording sheet with real or paper acorns. The half sheet can be used with any standard or non-standard measuring tool. I try to keep my kit prices affordable and worthwhile for both teachers and parents who may choose to purchase the kit. Thank you for supporting all my efforts at this time!

family activity · math · STEAM · topic

Apple Structures

Children love to be creative. They love to build and construct. And, if you give them something different, out of the ordinary as the building “blocks” of the structure… oh my!

So… give your child chopped up apples, toothpicks and tell them to build! That’s it. Give your child permission to build with their food… and when they are done, they get to have apple for a snack.

To the child they see… Cool! This is fun! But, to you the teacher/parent/caregiver… you see engineering!

Have your child there when you cut the apples. While you are working toss out terms such as cutting in half, quarters and even eights. Look I cut the apple in half, now if I cut this half in half I now have 4 pieces, that is quarters. How many pieces do you think I’ll have if I cut the quarters in half? Let’s see if you are right!

I cut each eighth into thirds… see all that math! Kitchen math is so important. Also, if your child is an older four and above, let them help you cut the apple. Even if it is hand over hand for a few chops, it is the start of self-help kitchen skills!

Ok… now take these apple chunks and make a structure. If it falls down, don’t solve it for them. “What do you think you could do to make it sturdier?” “Did you build a strong enough foundation? What do you need to add or take away?” What would happen if…

I typically build along side my students for a bit after they get started to see if they watch and ask questions. Do you think I should build high or wide? Why? Do you think it will fall over if I put this here? Why?

What do you predict will happen if we leave this structure up to show ______? How else can we show ______ your structure? Encourage your child to create an illustration of the structure.

Have fun… and enjoy this tasty STEAM project

family activity · math · STEAM · story · teachers pay teacher · topic

All Kinds of Apples!

More apple fun! Today let’s talk about apple products. Here is a short video showing how apple cider is pressed and another that shows how applesauce is made.

Time to graph! I have two suggestions for fun graphs. Favorite apple type (yum… time to taste test) or favorite apple product. Collecting information for a graph is the beginning of understanding data.

Create a graph for your child to use, I often make my graphs with a table in a word document. Having your child “help” while you create the sheet is a great way to incorporate a bit of technology too. (Or go old school and draw it out on a sheet of paper!) Choose the items you want to graph (types of apples: red delicious, golden delicious, granny smith etc) (types of apple product: applesauce, apple juice/cider, apple pie etc). Make sure to add a title to the graph.

Graphing is a great excuse to call grandparents or other family members. The more data points you have the better the graphing information you will collect. When making the graph provide on row for each member you will ask (in the graphs I made I would ask 5 people for the apple types and 8 people for the apple product).

Ok you made a graph… now what? Now you talk! Ask questions. “What can you tell me about the graph?” “Can you compare granny smith and red delicious?” Use terms such as more than, less than/fewer than, same as, least, most, compare.

Apple Zine Story

One more thing for today… since we talked about apple types and apple pie, check out another zine I made! (Directions to fold the zine can be found here) You can hop over to my Teacher Pay Teacher store and get two versions of this story free, or you can make your own!

math · teachers pay teacher · topic

Apple Pie Tree

This week we will talk about all things APPLES! Who doesn’t love this tasty fall fruit?

This week’s story is The Apple Pie Tree by Zoe Hall. Two sisters discuss the life cycle of the apples on the tree in their backyard. The story takes you through the four seasons from the bare tree of winter to picking apples to make apple pie.

After reading this story, lets do some apple tree math! I am going to share two simple math activities that you can easily do at home, and your child will enjoy!

Roll and Draw

  • paper
  • crayons/markers
  • dice

Have your child draw 4-6 apple trees (without apples). Roll the die and write the numeral on the trunk. Draw that many apples on the tree. If your child is ready, you can add in a second die. I would suggest using two different color dice if you have them and then have your child draw two different color apples.

Add and Draw

  • paper
  • markers/crayons
  • number cards (either create your own or use a deck of cards)

Again have your child draw apple trees without apples, I would draw less trees this time because they need more space, or use both sides of the paper. Have your child choose two cards, one card for each addend. They will write the number fact on the trunk and draw the apples on the tree. Again use two different colors for each addend.

In the picture, I show three ways to add to count. The first picture shows the base skill counting each apple from one to seven. The second tree illustrates counting on, I circled the six red apples and started counting up from there 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. The final tree is more of a first grade skill, but one worth looking at or showing your child. It is the concept of making know facts. In this case I made a doubles fact that I know. I found a group of five, and another group of five then added on the 1. I already know that 5+5 is 10 so I can count on from there. (This is also a make a 10… these are math strategies that are taught typically in first grade)

Apple Tree Ten Frames

Looking for more apple math activities? In my Teachers Pay Teachers store, you will find:

Apple Tree Ten Frames: practice using ten frames to practice number sense and addition.

Apples Abound: includes a variety of apple activities for both math and literacy (graphing, patterning, apple parts, Johnny Appleseed extension and more)

family activity · math · teachers pay teacher

Socks and Shoes Math

Kids shoes 1080P, 2K, 4K, 5K HD wallpapers free download | Wallpaper Flare
Stripy Socks Free Stock Photo - Public Domain Pictures

There are so many opportunities to incorporate math skills into every day activities. Since this week we have been focused on Pete the Cat getting ready for school, we should go find some socks and shoes! 

Children love to help around the house when you make it a game… this makes laundry and/or cleaning up a game AND learning! BONUS POINTS!!

Have your child find all of his/her shoes around the house, if your kiddos are like mine, the shoes are scattered about. Now make sure they are a matching pair. Have your child put the shoe away with the right and left on the correct sides, see sneaking in another skill… and setting the shoes up to wear. Next time you do laundry, have your child sort and match the socks. 

When we sort and match in school we use the words: sort, attributes, pair, matching, same, different, set

You can also have your child count the sets of shoes/socks.  State: How many pairs of shoes do you think you have? (this is estimating) Ok, let’s find out! You will probably need to show they how as they will typically count each shoe/sock not the pair.

If your child is comfortable with numbers you can show them how to count by twos to see how many shoes in total. State: “Ok so you have 4 pairs of shoes, how many shoes do you have in total?” They will now count each shoe. “Do you think there is a faster way to count the shoes?” See what your child comes up with on his/her own and then you can show him/her how to count by twos. 

Want to add in more… “Who do you think has the most pairs of shoes in our family?” “How can we figure this out?” Now you are comparing sets. Plus they will most likely straighten up everyone’s shoes in the process! 

Looking for more socks ideas? Check out this kit in my Teachers Pay Teachers store Socks, Socks, Wonderful Socks

Socks, Socks, Wonderful Socks
math · teaching thoughts

Math review– comparing

The ability to compare is natural to children. They see when things are different. The thing we need to work on it correct vocabulary AND correct comparisons.

comparing lengths
  • Comparing length/height: Provide a variety of items and have your child choose two. Ask them to tell you which is longer/taller or shorter. Demonstrate how to line up the end to get an accurate comparison. Once your child sees the comparison of two items, provide more items and have him/her line them up in order from shortest to tallest or reverse.
  • Comparing weights: Provide your child with a variety of times and talk about what is heavier/lighter. This is much easier to do with items that are VERY different in weights. Which would weigh more a baseball or a ping pong? Which would weight less a piece of paper or a book? You can also introduce your child to scales.
compare by matching (one-to-one correspondence)
  • Comparing quantities: Provide your child with a variety of objects and have him/her put them into groups and then count to compare. Here are a few skills that are important with this skill.
    • Matching to compare— line up the groups side by side so you see which has more/less (who does not have a partner)
    • Count to compare— count this group, count that group, which number is bigger? smaller?
    • Same quantities— don’t always have different quantities.

similar items/different sizes

When providing items for comparisons do not always provide groups with the same sized objects. Often times a child will see 3 beach balls as more than 7 ping pong balls because the larger item takes up more space.

Always have your child prove it to you. Show me how you figured that out. Often times children will guess or try to watch you for your answers. Getting children to talk about math is so important.

math · teaching thoughts

Math review– counting

Many times when we talk about counting, people automatically assume we are talking about counting aloud. While this is an important rote skill for children, it is not the only counting skill for children to work on.

Ranking the Numbers 1-10 | Earn This
  • Counting out loud— children at 3/4 should be able to count to 20 with limited mistakes. Often times they struggle with the forgetting a teen number or two. Another common mistake is generalizing the teen rule and stating 11-teen, 12-teen. Counting is a great thing to do while waiting! When your child makes a mistake, calmly state the number that should have come next and see if they continue from there. If they continue to make mistakes, then say… lets start again.
  • Counting objects– children need to count objects. This requires they understand that every object they touch is quantified by the number they are stating. Many children struggle with this concept and will either skip objects, skip numbers or count objects multiple times. Provide your child with a group of objects and have him/her count all the items. Often in the classroom we encourage children to set the objects up in lines or arrays to keep track of the items he/she has already counted. (work on sets up to 10) The goal of this is for your child to understand that the last number stated represents the number of objects in that group
    • touch to count– touch each object while counting
    • move to count– move each object while stating the number
    • line up to count– line up the objects into a line and then count
  • Counting back/down— children love to say 3,2,1 blast off. Start this with larger and larger numbers at this age they should be able to count back from 10. (again this is a great thing to do while waiting in line, in the car or other sit and wait moments)
  • Counting on— this skill can be done orally as well as by counting objects… it is an addition skill. Provide your child with a know number or quantity and then have him/her count up from there or count the rest of the objects from that spot.
    • 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 etc…
    • I have 5 blocks here count how many blocks are there if I add the rest of the blocks in? 5, 6, 7, 8