game

Beginning Sounds Game Boards

Children love playing games! My newest uploads into my Teachers Pay Teachers Store are four game boards to help your child practice and review recognize beginning sounds. Each game includes a game board and a set of pictures.

Players will choose picture cards. Look at the card, name the picture on the card. The first sound of that picture tells you where to move on the board. Move around the board and see who gets to the end first!

Beginning sound board game Dd, Jj, Pp, Ss— help the duck get to the pond ($1.50)

Beginning sound board game Ff, Hh, Mm, Qq, Vv— help the mouse get to the cheese($1.50)

Beginning sound board game Cc, Gg, Nn, Tt, Ww— help the race car get to the checkered flags($1.50)

Beginning sound board game Bb, Kk, Ll, Rr— help the butterfly get to the flower($1.50)

Whole set— this includes an extra board game (Aa, Ee, Ii, Oo, Uu, Qq, Yy, Zz) helping the octopus get to the seaweed and a blank board to help the cat get to the yarn ($5.00)

Parents… you too can order from Teachers Pay Teachers! All you need to do is create an account. It is a great place to locate items to help your child will all types of learning. They serve pre-K-12th grades.

math

math review– numbers 1-6

Six… why six? I wanted to provide some activities you can play with a die and well that is the numbers 1-6!

Roll and write. Create a grid paper and number it 1-6. As your child rolls the die, they fill in the grid with that number. You can have them use a pencil, crayon, marker or other writing tool. They can use the same color or a different color for each number, OR a different color for each row… make it fun!

Roll a watermelon. Draw, or have your child draw, a series of watermelon slices without seeds. Draw a line under or next to each watermelon. Have your child roll a die and then write the numeral on the line. Next, they need to draw that many seeds in the watermelon slice. I typically make more than 6 so that you can have duplicate numbers.

The photos for this activity didn’t want to load… grr! But, you can find them on my Instagram @mydayinpre_k

game · letter of the day · math · STEAM · story · teaching thoughts

Letter of the day- Tt

Tt is a great letter! Tigers, turtles, turkey, typing…. so much more. But today we are going to learn…

Tt song by Jack Hartmann

Printing Tt

Capital T– start at the top, straight line downnn, back to the top (but, on the left of the line), draw a line across the top past the center line

lowercase t– start at the top, straight line downnnn, up to the middle (but, on the left of the line), draw a line across the middle past the center line

Today’s activities: Transportation!

Before you even start, talk about the word transportation. Ask questions:

What form of transportation would you use to travel to Disney World? School?, Grocery Store?, Alaska?, the mailbox? … When asking these questions, ask why. When children answer questions they will often give you a one word answer, but we need to push for the reasoning…. why would you choose that? Why did you not choose ______? Why would you not use an airplane to go to the mailbox? Why would you not use a cruise ship to go to the grocery store? Encourage your child to think beyond the one word response!

graph of vehicles you see on a walk

Modes of transportation— this video shows various modes of transportation that are used on land, sea and sky.

Create a graph of different types of transportation. Have your child pick 4-6 types of transportation you might see in your own neighborhood. Take a walk and collect the data of how many of each type of vehicle you observe on your walk.

When you return discuss the graph. Which vehicle did you see the most? Why do you think that was the result? Which did you see the least? What else can you tell me about the graph? How many more cars were there than trucks? How many more planes would you need to see to match the number of bikes?

build your own vehicle

If I Built a Car by Chris Van Dusen– Jack describes all the things he would include if he

built his own car.

Encourage your child to create his/her own car (or other vehicle). They can use whatever they want… Lego, loose parts, draw it on paper, whatever. Encourage them to be creative… think outside the box. Then say “Tell me about your car”. If they can’t figure out how to start ask “What does this do?”

driving lazy eights

Crossing the midline is a skill that is normally developed by 4. Your body has two invisible midlines… down the center of your body and across the torso. Children need to be able comfortably cross the midline to correctly write letters, draw shapes and so much more. Your child needs to be able to fluidly move their limbs across the midline (move your left hand over to the right side of the body in one fluid movement).

There are many skills and activities that practice this skill. But, today I’m going to share one… lazy eights (infinity signs). Having your child draw these in the air or with materials is a great way to practice. But, you can also have your child drive the lazy eight. They need to do it in fluid motions with only one hand at a time. (children who cannot cross the midline will try to swap hands in the middle) The bigger (within a child’s arm reach) the 8 the easier it is for them to drive. This is a great sidewalk chalk activity… create a lazy 8 on the sidewalk and have your child drive their vehicles on the eight.

art · game · letter of the day · letter work · math · story

Letter of the Day– Dd

D is for Dots! I chose this topic for two reasons. One I had a few good stories to share that will get you and your child talking AND being creative. Two, this leads itself to math in so many ways. If you follow my blog on a regular basis you know the importance of dots and math skills. Children who develop a strong understanding of subitizing, the ability to perceive at a glance the number of items in a group, are able to utilize this skill in learning addition, subtraction and later math skills. The most common configurations are found on dice and dominoes… dots!

Jack Hartmann’s Dd song

Jack Hartmann’s subitize songs Subitizing up to 5 and Subitizing up to 10— these are more of an interactive game than a song as he shows sets and has the children yell out the answer, then the correct number is shown.

Printing Dd

Capital D– start at the top and go straight downnnn, jump back up to the top and curve right and down the bottom. (often times children make the curve too flat or curve in before they get to the bottom)

lowercase d– make a “c”, go upppppp and then straight back downnnn on the same line (this helps make that little tail that we think of when you see a lowercase d)

Today’s activities: Dots!

The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds

Dot by Patricia Intriago (I like this version too. They made the book active, which is cool, other than there are no words to see.

“The Dot” is about Vashti who believes that she can’t not draw. Her art teacher shows her differently by framing her “dot” just one dot. This inspires Vashti to show that she can do better than that, she can make better dots. Encourage your little artist to create his/her own dot pictures. These can be done in any medium (chalk, crayon, rocks, markers, watercolors, whatever). Then challenge him/her to try a different way. Each way should look and feel different, but they will all represent a dot or dots. Each time have your child explain their dot picture and then help him/her label it.

“Dot” takes the concept of a dot and changes it to show opposites. So, lets play a game with opposites. Say or show your child one part of the opposite and see if he/she can determine the other. I say hot, you say cold. I go in, you go out. Learning about opposites is the first step in learning to compare and contrast. What makes things the same and different… in the case of opposites, different.

Teach your child to play dominoes. While children love to set up and knock down domino trains, which is a great fine motor, motor planning and engineering activity, learning to play the actual game of dominoes is a great number sense activity.

Number matching– provide your child with sets of dominoes that add up to a few numbers. I drew out sets of 5 and 6, but you can choose to do more. Have your child count all of the dots and determine where to sort the domino. You can continue and test out additional sets or introduce addition in the sense of 1 and 4 more makes 5, 2 and 4 more makes 6. (if you do not have dominoes, you can make them out of paper for this activity)

game · math

Math Monday- Numbers and Bubbles

I did not get around to posting my topic post yesterday. Oops.. oh well I’ll call it a Mother’s day pass.

This week I have provided my students activities that deal with bubbles. Who doesn’t love bubbles? I will share links to stories and science videos tomorrow during topic Tuesday.

Here are two fun games to play with numbers and bubbles.

Count the bubbles… yep that’s it. Children at this age love an excuse to count. So blow bubbles and have them count the bubbles as they pop them. Or work on blowing bubbles and have them count the number of bubbles they can blow. Want to make it a challenge? Set a timer and each person blows bubbles for 2 minutes or so. See who can count more in that time frame.

Bump!

bump

This is a fun game that can be adapted in so many ways.

  • game board, this can be done on a piece of paper, or even on your sidewalk with chalk!
  • 2 dice
  • counters/markers (outside you can use rocks, inside anything you can put on top, clear or little are better)

Roll the dice. Add them together. Find the number on the board and cover that number. Now it is the next players turn. He/she rolls. They also cover a number, but if they roll the same number they can choose to put their piece on an uncovered number or bump their opponent off the number. (if player A rolled a 5 and player B has a piece on a 5, player A can put their piece on that 5 and take player B’s piece off the board). If you do not want to get bumped, you can double stack your piece (by rolling the same number twice). The first person to cover 5 numbers wins. (adaptation, cover the whole board and then the person with the most covers wins)

pop the bubbles

One last fun thing to do… ok, yes I said 2, but you get a bonus this time. If you have play dough, then this is a fun game for your child.

Pop the bubbles

Have your child write the numbers 1-12 or 0-10 or whatever combination of numbers you want to work on today. Give your child play dough and have him/her make play dough bubbles to match the number. Now go back and pop (squish) the bubbles to check your counting. Another skill you could practice is counting down. Have your child count up as they make the “bubbles” and then count backwards while “popping” them.