story · topic

Little Bird Takes a Bath

Today’s story is again about a bird, but I think you will see that this story is closer to realistic fiction than yesterdays. Little Bird Takes a Bath by Marisabina Russo. In this story, little bird does not like the rain, but the rain bring puddles and puddles means a bath for little bird. Follow along as little bird tries very hard to enjoy a bath in the just right puddle.

This story is perfect for a timeline project. Having children retell stories is important. We want them to tell the story in order. What came first, then, next and finally. But, often times there are more details that they want to share. The key still is to get the details in the right order. This is where the concept of a timeline comes into play. Teaching timelines and reading timelines will be beneficial as your child gets older and needs to understand and explain many historical activities. But, at this age, we work on the timeline of yourself and of stories.

Create a timeline of the book Little Bird Takes a Bath. Notice I didn’t add big details or write in full sentences. The key is to put the main idea with a picture clue. This will help your child retell the story. We are looking for the main points, and the picture cues are to help your child recall.

Another fun timeline project is to have your child make a timeline of their day. This can be done in one sitting or done over the day.

math · story · teaching thoughts · topic

Ten Eggs

We will wrap up this week with one more egg story. Today’s story Ten Eggs in a Nest by Marilyn Sadler. Gwen the hen and Red the rooster are very excited for their eggs to hatch. Since it is “bad luck to count your eggs before they hatch”, Red doesn’t know how many eggs were laid. When the eggs begin to hatch, Red travels back and forth to the worm store to purchase worms for the new chicks.

This book would be a great opportunity to discuss the difference between fantasy and reality. We want children to enjoy the imaginative worlds that are created for them in their cartoons and storybooks, but at the same time we need them to begin to see that there is often a big difference between the fantasy of a fiction story and the reality of life (non-fiction or informational text).

Create a T chart to compare items in the story that are fantasy and those that are based in reality. Have your child explain why they believe each item belongs under fantasy or reality. If the item belongs under fantasy, challenge your child to explain what the reality would look like.

To extend the learning…

This book leads easily into math!

one to one correspondence (the ability to match items to other items or to a corresponding number. this helps solidify the concept of quantity)

provide your child with 10 eggs, have your child use items or illustrations to match one chick to each egg and then take it a step further and create one worm for each chick. If your child is struggling, remove eggs and start with a much smaller number.

Use the same eggs, chicks and worms to compare quantities. set out a number of eggs, chicks and worms (have them be all different quantities to begin). Then ask “What can you tell me about the amount of eggs, chicks and worms now?” Notice I didn’t point the children into using specific terms yet. You want to see what they observe on their own first. We hope they will say there are more/less _____ than _____, or _____ has the most/least. The ability to compare quantities is a key piece in number sense and will assist them moving into addition and subtraction as well as graphing and other math skills.

The other direction you could easily take with this story is ways to build a 10. In the story they mention that 1+2+3+4=10. This is another skill that is key for children to develop. We want them to understand that the concept of addition is to bring more into a group of items. Often times we focus on ___+____=____. This is important, but being able to decompose numbers into a variety of groupings will help with mental math later. Have your child use Lego or other colored items to group items into 10s. 2 red +3 yellow+2 green +1 white +2 black = 10 Lego bricks. This will help your child when they are approaching word problems later. You could easily state this in terms of a word problem and have your child illustrate it as well. I have a building that has 10 bricks. 5 are yellow, 1 is red and the rest are green. How many green blocks do I have? Then have your child build it to determine how many green they need.

math · STEAM · story · topic

What is Growing Inside This Egg?

Today we will continue to learn about eggs! Our story What is Growing Inside This Egg by Mia Posada, uses riddles to learn more about various animals that are hatched out of eggs. At the end of this recording, the teacher provided the directions to an activity for her class, but this can be done by your child at home. Cut out an egg shape. Now glue that egg shape onto a sheet of paper. Use this egg shape to make an adult animal who lays eggs (turtle, bird, frog, octopus, spider etc…). Then have your child write a fact about this animal.

Do you need more facts about oviparous animals? Watch this power point video made by Mattahunt Elementary School about oviparous animals and their eggs.

To extend our learning today, lets do some math! Here are a few ideas.

Draw simple nests on a sheet of paper and have your child roll a die or a pair of dice to find out many eggs to draw in the nest. Do not want to draw nests? That’s fine… not all eggs are in nests! You can draw egg cartons, a line to draw octopus eggs, etc…

Another fun addition or number practice would be to cut out a variety of eggs and write numbers on the eggs. Then provide your child with dominoes. Have your child sort the dominoes so the addition fact matches the number on the egg.

Ready to go beyond that? Practice greater than, less than and equal to with the number eggs you made above. Teach your child that the symbol eats the bigger number. But, make sure you also have your child read the number sentence to you. Many children can set up the fact, but then struggle to state what the number sentence says. 9>3 nine is greater than three. 1<8 one is less than eight.

math · STEAM · teaching thoughts · topic

Eggs

Today let’s look at some animals who are hatched from eggs. Can you list some? Did you think of any that are not birds? Let’s read the book Chickens Aren’t the Only Ones by Ruth Heller.

After listening to the story, make a circle map of all the animals that lay eggs that you remember. So many things come from eggs. How many did you remember?

How to extend the learning…

  • hide small animal toys or pictures in eggs and then sort them by animals that come from eggs and not from eggs. Create a simple T chart for use of sorting.
  • Go on a walk and keep a tally chart or write on a T chart all the animals you see and if they come from eggs or not.
  • cook eggs for breakfast, lunch or even dinner!
  • looking to challenge your kiddo? write the names of all the animals they listed on the circle map on small sheets of paper (or just cut them off the chart from earlier). Now have your child put them in alphabetical order. Or, sort the words by beginning sounds. Or by the number of letters in the word. Or by animal type. Or….

Ok… so what is my child learning??? Not only is your child learning about the animals that are hatched from eggs, which in an of itself is a big topic, but they are also: classifying, counting, sorting, observing, discussing, debating, exploring, and more!

By having your child record the observations made you are having your child recall information and then organize the thoughts onto the chart, this is not only a science skill, but also a pre-writing skill (as in before you write, not just before you are able to write). Both the circle map and the T chart are graphic organizers. Sorting, counting, tally counting are all math skills.

By going on a nature walk and observing you are connecting the learning to the real world around you and helping extend the learning. Did you come across any animals that your child did not know where they should be classified?

The use of the plastic eggs and toys brings in an additional element of fun.

art · letter of the day · letter work · STEAM · story

Letter of the Day- Ii

Today we are on the letter Ii. When you work on vowels, focus on the short sound of the vowel, in the case of the letter Ii it is the sound you hear at the beginning of iguana, inch, insect and in the middle of chip, hit, and tin.

Jack Hartmann Ii song

Printing the letter Ii

Capital I- start at the top, go downnn, cross at the top, cross at the bottom

lowercase i- go downnn, jump up above the line and then put a dot (make sure it is not attached– that’s a lollipop, or a big huge scribbled circle… just a visible dot)

Today’s activities: Iguanas!

I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufmann Orloff— Alex really wants an iguana. His friend is moving away and needs to rehouse his iguana. Alex writes his mom note explaining why he should have an iguana.

Write your mom/dad/sister/brother/imaginary friend/whoever, a letter explaining why you need something you really want. This is a great opportunity to practice writing a letter. Let your child write this in any form/method they choose. You do not have to write it for them. Have your child read you the letter and explain what it says. Then write back

6 Insane Iguana Facts

Pick one or more facts about the iguana and use it in a picture of iguanas. Compare these facts to facts you know about other animals, such as a pet you own or your favorite type of animal.

Complete a direct drawing of an iguana. Here are two options KidArtX and Art For Kid Hub

game · phonemic awareness

Phonemic Awareness Thursday- No Zoo for You!

As I mentioned in my last post on phonemic awareness, phonemic awareness is the understanding of how sounds work. These skills are auditory and should not be taught with the visuals of words, until the skill is mastered auditorily.

Today we will work on listening to words that begin with the same beginning sounds. Here is a link to a Jack Hartmann video on beginning sounds… my class loves Jack Hartmann. I hope you do too.

No Zoo For You

For the activity you will need animal pictures or toys. (you could do this same activity with types of foods or other categories of items, just change the title)

no zoo for you

I decided to group my animals by typical location (forest, zoo, pond and farm).

Have your child tell you the name of all three animals. The then have to determine which of the three animals does not start with the same beginning sound. They remove that animal and say “No zoo for you!” Continue doing this until you have determined which animals can and cannot fit in each zoo.

If this is too hard, then say each animal word for your child putting emphasis on the beginning sound (/b/-bear, /ch/chipmunk, /b/bird) which two start with /b/?

If this is really easy? Then have your child think of other animals that could fit in the same zoo. bear, bird, butterfly, buck, etc…