STEAM · story · teaching thoughts · topic

Penguin Flying?

Today, let’s read a fantasy story about a penguin who wanted to fly. The Penguin Who Wanted to Fly by Catherine Vase. Flip-Flop wants to fly like, but he can’t fly. So, he decide to get creative and try to find other ways to fly.

Create a paper version of Flip-Flop and then problem solve ways that you can help Flip-Flop fly! This is a great challenge project for your child. You can either provide materials such as paper, string, a small paper cup, tape. Challenge your child to find ways to help Flip-Flop fly. They could make a paper airplane, a zip-line, a “hot air balloon”. Maybe they want to put him into a toy plane, build something out of Lego or even make him a parachute. The point is to let your child’s creativity drive the result on how (s)he can help Flip-Flop fly. Also remember that failure is part of the process. In the story, Flip-Flop did not give up when his ideas were a flop, he just came up with another thought and then another. We need encourage children to try again. Look at things a different way, and not give up.

While searching for the story above, I found a different version of this idea. The Penguin Who Wanted to Fly by Rob Spicier This one is made of photographs put together to match the text written by the narrator. Umiak is a penguin who wants to fly like the puffins. He talks to other animals who live near him to find the answer to why he can’t fly. His mother helps him see that penguins do fly, just differently than other birds.

Why did both stories say that penguins can fly in the water? Is this really flying? Why do you think they compared the way that penguins move in the water to flying?

Another activity that these two stories work well with is comparisons. Create a Venn Diagram or Double Bubble Map to compare and contrast the two stories. How are they the same? How are they different?

Venn Diagram Maker | Lucidchart
Science- Double Bubble Map Instructions by Grant Ed | TpT

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